Miscellaneous Texts for use in the Contemplation of Feelings

Posted: September 16, 2014 in සරණක් සොයා ෴

Feelings are like bubbles.

Khandha Samyutta No. 95

All things converge on feelings.

Anguttara Nikaya, Nines, No. 14

“All feeling — whether it is of the past, the future or the present, whether in oneself or in others, whether coarse or sublime, inferior or superior, far or near — should be seen with right understanding as it actually is: ‘This is not mine, this I am not, this is not a self of mine.'”

Anatta-lakkhana Sutta, Samyutta Nikaya, XXII, 59.

Pleasant feeling is pleasant when present; it is painful when changing.Painful feeling is painful when present; it is pleasant when changing.

Neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling is pleasant if one understands it; it is painful if there is no understanding.

Majjhima Nikaya No. 44; Cula-vedalla Sutta

A well-taught noble disciple… does not consider feeling as the self nor the self as the owner of the feeling, nor feeling as included within the self, nor the self as included within the feeling.Of such a well-taught noble disciple it can be said that he is unfettered by the bondage of feeling, unfettered by bondage inner or outer. He has seen the coast, he has seen the Other Shore, and he is fully freed from suffering — this I say.

Khandha Samyutta No. 117

It was said that one should know the feelings, their conditioned origin, their diversity, their outcome, their cessation, and the way to their cessation. Why was this said?What are the feelings? These three: pleasant, painful, and neither-painful-nor-pleasant.

What is the conditioned origin of these feelings? Sense-impression is the conditioned origin of the feelings.

What is the diversity in feelings? There are pleasant feelings, worldly and unworldly; there are painful feelings, worldly and unworldly; and there are neutral feelings, worldly and unworldly.

What is the outcome of feelings? It is the personalized existence (attabhava) born of this or that (feeling), be it of a meritorious or demeritorious character, which one who feels causes to arise.

What is the cessation of feelings? It is the cessation of sense impression that is the cessation of feelings.

And it is the noble eightfold path that is the way leading to the cessation of feelings, namely: right understanding, right thought, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness and right concentration.

If a noble disciple knows in such way the feelings, their conditioned origin, their diversity, their outcome, their cessation, and the way to their cessation, he will be one who knows this penetrative Holy Life, namely the cessation of feelings.

From Anguttara Nikaya, Sixes, No. 63

On account of what has it been said that the four Noble Truths are the Dhamma taught by me, which is unrefuted, untarnished, irreproachable and uncensored by intelligent ascetics and brahmans?Based on the six elements[21] there is descent into the womb. When such descent into the womb takes place, there will be mind-and-body (nama-rupa). Mind-and-body conditions the sixfold sense-base. The sixfold sense-base conditions sense-impression. Sense-impression conditions feeling. Now it is for one who feels[22] that I make known, ‘This is suffering,’ ‘This is the origin of suffering,’ ‘This is the cessation of suffering,’ ‘This is the way leading to the cessation of suffering.’

From Anguttara Nikaya, Threes, No.61

“Sisters, suppose there is a lamp burning: its oil, its wick, its flame, its radiance, all are impermanent and liable to change. Now, would anyone speak correctly when saying: ‘When this lamp is burning, its oil, wick and flame are impermanent and liable to change, but its radiance is permanent, everlasting, eternal, and not liable to change?'” — “Certainly not, venerable sir.” “Why not?” — “Because, venerable sir, when that lamp burns, its oil is impermanent and liable to change, and so are the wick, the flame and the radiance.””In the same way, sisters, would anyone speak correctly when saying: “These six (organ) bases in oneself are impermanent, but what, dependent on them, I feel as pleasant or painful or neither-painful-nor-pleasant, that is permanent, ever-lasting, eternal, and not liable to change’?” — “Certainly not, venerable sir.” “Why not?” — “Because, venerable sir, each kind of feeling arises dependent on its appropriate condition, and with the cessation of the appropriate condition the corresponding feeling ceases.”

“Well said, sisters, well said! When a noble disciple perceives this, he sees it with right understanding, as it actually is.”

From Majjhima Nikaya No. 146; Nandaka’s Exhortation

Pleasant feeling is impermanent, conditioned, dependently arisen, having the nature of wasting, vanishing, fading and ceasing. The painful feeling and the neutral feeling, too, are impermanent, conditioned, dependently arisen, having the nature of wasting, vanishing, fading and ceasing.When a well-taught disciple perceives this, he becomes dispassionate towards pleasant feelings, dispassionate toward painful feelings and dispassionate toward neutral feelings. Being dispassionate, his lust fades away, and with the fading away of lust, he is liberated. When liberated, there comes to him the knowledge that he is liberated. He now knows: ‘Birth is exhausted, the holy life has been lived, done is what was to be done, there is no more of this to come.’

A monk whose mind is thus liberated, concurs with none and disputes with none; he employs the speech commonly used in the world, but without misapprehending it.

From Majjhima Nikaya No. 74; Dighanakha

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